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Architects Team Up To Ditch Gas In Australian Homes

Sustainable Homes

If you follow any Australian architects on social media, you might have noticed a recent campaign encouraging the industry to ‘get off the gas.’

Supported by leading practices including Breathe, Kennedy Nolan, Hayball, Bates Smart, Auhaus, and Plus, the campaign was launched to encourage more homes powered purely by electricity (ideally from renewable resources) to help tackle the climate crisis.

There’s never been a better time to go all-electric. Temperatures around the world are soaring; gas prices are rising; solar power is more accessible than ever; and local gas shortages are currently triggering emergency measures. It can also help save you money

Here’s everything you need to know to ditch gas for good.

22nd July, 2022

Elemental House by Ben Callery Architects is an all-electric home that operates off-grid. Photo – Marnie Hawson. Styling – Belle Hemming

Garden House by Austin Maynard Architects is completely self-powered. The house creates enough energy to charge the family’s electric car and power the entire home (including hydronic heating, cooktops, ovens and a heated pool), has no gas connection. Photography – Derek Swalwell. Furniture, art and object styling– Simone Haag

The all-electric kitchen at Garden House by Austin Maynard Architects. Photography – Derek Swalwell. Furniture, art and object styling– Simone Haag

An electric car charging at Garden House by Austin Maynard Architects. Photography – Derek Swalwell. Furniture, art and object styling– Simone Haag

Vivarium by Architecture Architecture runs on 100% electricity, ensuring zero gas use. The house is connected to three-phase power, to run electric hydronic heating and in anticipation of an electric car. Photos – Tom Ross

The Cove II by The Sociable Weaver. Photo – Marnie Hawson.

Fireside House by Breathe Architecture is gas-free, with an all-electric services system connected to 100% GreenPower and a 9.6kW PV array, which has provision for future battery storage. Photos– Tom Ross

Elemental House by Ben Callery Architects. Photo – Marnie Hawson. Styling – Belle Hemming

Amelia Barnes
Friday 22nd July 2022

‘This is [about] progress over perfection. It’s totally okay to take one small, manageable step at a time, moving towards an all-electric future. The key is committing not to buy any new gas appliances.’ – Jeremy McLeod.

The world is in the midst of a climate crisis caused primarily by burning fossil fuels such as oil, coal, and gas.

Armed with this simple fact and a passion to change the status quo, a group of leading local architects and designers (Breathe, Kennedy Nolan, Hayball, Bates Smart, Auhaus, Plus, Nest, Maddison, Bower, John Wardle, and more) recently teamed up to launch ‘get off the gas’ — a social media campaign encouraging more all-electric homes.

Around 70 per cent of Australian homes use a form of gas for their cooking, bathing, or heating — but there are alternatives. An all-electric home is not only more environmentally sustainable when powered by solar or GreenPower, it’s often cheaper to run in the long term, and just as elegant in appearance. 

The recent residential work of Austin Maynard Architects, Ben Callery Architects, The Sociable Weaver, Architecture Architecture, and EME Design are just a few examples of beautiful homes with no gas connection. 

So if all-electric homes are possible, why don’t we all have them?

According to Jeremy McLeod, founding director of Breathe Architecture, Australians have built a reliance on gas after decades of advertising and lobbying from the gas industry. 

The requirement that all new builds be connected to the gas network was removed just weeks ago in Victoria.

There’s also a longstanding perception that gas, especially when used for heating, is cheaper than electricity. However, with gas prices rising, and electric appliances becoming more efficient, Jeremy says this is no longer the case.

‘Some of the all-electric technology like induction cooktops and heat pumps for hot water are more expensive to buy than their gas equivalent, but their installation is generally simpler and more affordable. Also, these appliances are generally more efficient and are cheaper to run over the life of the building.’

As more homes transition to becoming all-electric, Jeremy says energy generators will increase supply to meet that demand. ‘Importantly, as we push down demand for gas, this will also lead to less reliance on gas and future gas exploration.’

This is especially important in the current climate, with Australia experiencing recent shortages of electricity and gas. Just this week, the national energy operator activated emergency measures to guarantee gas supplies for Victoria amid concerns the state faces a winter shortage.

‘All-electric households with solar (and eventually batteries and electric vehicles) will increasingly be an integral part of the energy system, helping to balance supply and demand across the day and through the seasons,’ says Jeremy.  

Going all-electric is particularly relevant to new homes that don’t require replacing gas appliances and infrastructure. In the case of homes with existing gas systems (that have already contributed significant carbon emissions in their manufacturing) Jeremy says these may be worth keeping until the end of their lifespan. 

‘This is [about] progress over perfection. It’s totally okay to take one small, manageable step at a time, moving towards an all-electric future. The key is committing not to buy any new gas appliances,’ he says. 

Companies such as Goodbye Gas in Victoria can help home owners navigate these decisions to make the switch. 

Australia’s built environment industry is a long way off being proud of their carbon footprint, but Jeremy says investing in an all-electric future is a move in the right direction. 

‘We’re optimists at Breathe, but we’re also pragmatists. This is such an easy step for all of us to take, but it also has an incredible impact.’ 

Architects, clients and builders can further encourage a more sustainable residential environment by creating smaller homes; renovating over rebuilding; orienting buildings to the sun; and investing in low carbon, locally-sourced, and natural materials wherever possible. 

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