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Antique Perennials

Gardens

Apparently around 150 plants can fit in one carry-on bag… or so modern day planthunters Matt Reed and Michael Morant inform us, in this incredibly moving story!

The duo from Antique Perennials, a nursery in Kinglake, 45km North East of central Melbourne, talk to Georgina Reid of The Planthunter about losing their property in the Black Saturday bushfires, re-building from scratch, and the incredibly diverse plants available to grow in Australian gardens.

31st July, 2017

Kniphofia ‘Strawberries and Cream’ (centre), Helenium ‘Wyndley’ (right) and Helenium ‘Crimson Beauty’ at Antique Perennials. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Agapanthus ’Bressingham Blue’, Helenium ‘Zimblesturn’ (yellow shrub at back right) and Helenium ‘Crimson Beauty’ (back right). Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Echinacea ‘Rich Red’. This plant was bred by Matt and Michael. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Matt Reed (left) and Michael Morant of Antique Perennials. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Sanguisorba ‘Cangshan Cranberry’. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Miscanthus ‘Kleine Fontaine’. The tree in the background is an 80-year-old English oak, which was killed in the Black Saturday fires. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

The stock beds at Antique Perennials are turned over every year. Plants are pulled up, divided, organic matter added, and re-planted. Aster ‘Otis’, the blue flowering plant in foreground, was bred by Michael and named after his son. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Aster ‘Twilight’ (front), Echinacea ‘Razzamatazz’ (middle right), Veronicastrum ‘Coen Jenson’ (middle left). Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Matt Reed (left) and Michael Morant with Hercules the dog. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Echinops ‘Veitchs Blue’. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Achillea ‘Mondepagode’ (front), Echinacea ‘Double Decker’ (centre), Helianthus biglovii (rear). Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files.

Georgina Reid
Monday 31st July 2017

‘We try to grow plants that look great in the garden, year after year. That’s our point of difference.’ – Matt Reed.

 

Some people go overseas and return home with their carry-on luggage jammed full of duty free alcohol, perfume and last minute gifts for grandparents and nephews. Others, like Matt Reed and Michael Morant, fill their suitcases with plants. The pair are modern day plant hunters, passionate about sniffing out new and interesting perennials to introduce into Australia through their business, Antique Perennials.

Until Australian quarantine laws changed a few years back (due to the threat of Xyllela, a very scary bacterium that affects a wide range of food crops and ornamental plants – it’s not in Australia yet, but is causing havoc in many parts of the world), Matt and Michael would head overseas every 18 months or so. ‘We’d visit plant collectors, plant explorers and rare plant nurseries, looking for new plants to bring home,’ Matt tells me. They’d clean all the soil off each plant, get it inspected and certified, pack into moist towelling and place in their hand luggage. ‘We can get around 150 plants in one carry-on bag,’ he tells me. ‘They’re too precious to go underneath in the hold.’ Once they reach Australia the plants would spend three to six months in quarantine before the pair could bring their valuable babies home to their nursery in Kinglake, north-east of Melbourne.

Matt and Michael started Antique Perennials around 18 years ago. ‘I’d been collecting rare and unusual plants for 20 years, and realised my one-acre garden in Kinglake easily had enough plants in it to propagate from and start a nursery.’ tells Matt. So they did, and while Matt tells me demand for their plants has always outstripped supply, the road hasn’t always been easy.

In 2009, both Matt and Michael’s homes and the nursery were destroyed by the Black Saturday bushfires. ‘All that was left was a few fence posts,’ Matt tells me. ‘All our years of plant collecting just vaporised.’ With the support of fellow plant lovers and customers, the pair rebuilt their plant collection. ‘We had plants sent back to us from all over Australia, from people who had heard what had happened,’ Matt says. ‘We’re definitely bigger and better now than we were before the fires.’

The pair now operate the nursery from a former potato farm, with rich soil and a good water supply. They grow around 1000 different plants on four acres, focusing on ‘garden-worthy’ perennial plants rather than ‘pot-worthy’ plants. ‘We try to grow plants that look great in the garden, year after year,’ Matt says. ‘They may not look as good in a pot at the nursery, but once they get in the garden they’re fantastic. That’s our point of difference.’

Matt and Michael focus on growing herbaceous perennials – plants that flower in spring and summer, and often either die back or are cut back in winter. In contract to to the relatively stable growth habit of a box hedge, for example, perennials provide textural contrast, a sense of movement and seasonality within a garden. They’re ephemeral, colourful, seasonal beauties that create achingly beautiful summer gardens full of movement and life, and quiet, austere winter spaces holding both promise and reprieve. They’re the medium of northern hemisphere designers and plant people such as Piet Oudolf, Beth Chatto, and  Dan Pearson, and are gaining popularity in Australia, thanks to folk like Matt and Michael.

I love talking to people like Matt Reed, it reminds me of the incredibly diverse and beautiful plants available to grow in Australian gardens. The botanical world is vast – way, way, WAY bigger than we’re led to believe at large hardware store nurseries. There’s so much more to discover, grow and understand. Passionate growers like Matt Reed and Michael Morant from Antique Perennials remind us to think outside the box hedge!

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