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The Tastiest Tuesdays of 2016 · Free to Feed's Persian Nougat

Food

Today we’re continuing our recap of the TASTIEST Tuesdays of 2016!

One major culinary highlight of the year was our collaboration with Free to Feed. Free to Feed is a not-for-profit cooking class and workshop program hosted by asylum seekers and refugees in Melbourne.

We were lucky enough to have Hamed Allahyari of Free to Feed and Julia Busuttil Nishimura of OSTRO introduce us to some of Iran’s most popular sweet and savoury dishes. This Persian rosewater and pistachio sticky nougat, known as ‘Gaz’ to locals, is simply outstanding!

17th January, 2017

Persian nougat. Recipe by Hamed Allahyari and Julia Ostro for Free To Feed. Props: Flat plate by Shiko. Surface from Fibonacci Stone. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Lucy Feagins, assistant styling – Natalie Turnbull.

Nougat ingredients. Recipe by Hamed Allahyari and Julia Ostro for Free To Feed. Props: Linen napkin from Mr Draper, glass mug from Muji, flat bowl by Sophie Harle. Surface from Fibonacci Stone. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Lucy Feagins, assistant styling – Natalie Turnbull.

Persian nougat. Recipe by Hamed Allahyari and Julia Ostro for Free To Feed. Props: Plate by Valerie Restarick, linen napkin from Mr Draper, Cutipol gold cutlery from Francalia, green condiment dishes from The Establishment Studios. Surface from Fibonacci Stone. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Lucy Feagins, assistant styling – Natalie Turnbull.

Hamed Allahyari and Julia Busuttil Nishimura of Free to Feed
Tuesday 17th January 2017

Persian nougat, also known as Gaz, is super sticky and famously originates from the city of Isfahan, where people flock from all over Iran to purchase the freshest Gaz. Hamed recalled times when he would travel to Isfahan, simply to buy the sweet sticky candy. The more pistachios, the more expensive and prized it would be. If you were trying to impress someone, you would come back from Isfahan with some Gaz, seriously loaded with pistachios.

While the most commonly found Gaz contains only pistachios, we’ve added barberries into the mixture to give a little hint of sourness. We’ve also made a batch with sour cherries, which are a little sweeter than the barberries, but work really well. Persian nougat is quite soft, so if it’s a warm day, keep it in the fridge to avoid it melting. The nougat isn’t too difficult to make, however, it’s so important to have everything ready as once the sugar syrup has reached temperature, you need to work fast.

Ingredients (Makes approx 20 x 20cm square)

200g raw unsalted pistachio kernels
80g barberries
360g caster sugar
110ml liquid glucose
210g honey
60g egg whites (approximately two)
1 tbsp rosewater
Zest of 1 orange
Two sheets of edible rice paper
100ml water

Method

Line a 20cm deep square cake tin with one sheet of the edible rice paper, shiny side down. Alternatively, line the tray with baking paper. The mixture will be super sticky, so you want to do your best to prevent it sticking to the tin.

Preheat oven to the lowest temperature. Place the pistachios and barberries on a tray and keep warm in the oven until ready to use.

Place the sugar, liquid glucose, honey and 100ml water in a medium saucepan and over a medium flame heat to 135C on a candy thermometer. This should take around 10 minutes.

While the sugar is reaching 135C, place the egg whites in a very clean bowl of an electric mixer with a balloon whisk attachment. When the sugar syrup reaches approximately 130C, begin to whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks. Once the sugar syrup reaches 135C, with the mixer on medium speed, slowly pour the sugar syrup into the egg whites. Increase the speed and beat until thick and glossy (approximately two minutes).

Working quickly, fold in the warm pistachios and barberries, the rosewater and orange zest. Spoon mixture into the prepared tin, smooth the surface, and top with the second piece of edible rice paper, shiny side up.

Allow to cool completely overnight or for at least 4 hours. Cut the Gaz into pieces using a very sharp knife and serve with sour cherry tea.

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